Inclusiveness

Promoting housing affordabilityFavoriser l’accessibilité financière des logements

The affordability of housing is the capacity of a country to deliver good quality housing at an accessible price for all. Evidence shows that the affordability of the housing sector has been declining over time across most OECD countries although governments have different policy options to make housing more affordable.

This section provides an overview of the main outcomes about housing affordability and displays indicators, that measure country-specific performance across various dimensions.

L’accessibilité financière des logements se rapporte à la capacité d’un pays à offrir des logements de qualité à un prix abordable pour tous. Les données mettent en évidence une diminution de l’accessibilité financière des logements dans la plupart des pays de l’OCDE, mais différentes mesures peuvent être prises par les pouvoirs publics pour étoffer l’offre de logements.

Cette partie offre une vue d’ensemble des principales conclusions des travaux relatifs à l’accessibilité financière des logements et montre les résultats obtenus par chaque pays à l’aune d’indicateurs chiffrés.



Key housing data

Données clés sur le logement

Households spend the most on housing …



Household consumption spending by item, by income class, OECD average, 2016 or latest year available.

Housing expenditure represents on average 37% of household consumption spending by lower income households, 31% by middle income households and 25% by upper income households. Among all income groups, housing is the largest spending item although decreasing with income.

Lower refers to the bottom income quintile (20% poorest households); “upper” refers to the top quintile (20% richest households).

Source: OECD Affordable Housing database


get data données

… and housing’s share in household budgets has greatly increased in recent years.



Percentage point change in shares by item, household budgets for all income groups

As house prices have increased in most countries since 2005, housing is, on average, not only the largest spending item in household budgets but also the fastest growing item over time. From 2005 to 2015 housing expenditure has increased by 5 percentage point on average among OECD-20 countres.

OECD-20 unweighted average refers to Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Finland, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Latvia, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, the Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and Turkey.

OECD-10 unweighted average refers to Austria, Belgium, Finland, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal and Sweden.

Source: OECD Affordable Housing database


get data données

House prices have grown a lot over the past 15 years …



Real house price index (2015=100)

Over the period 2005-2019 real house prices have increased in almost all OECD countries. On average across OECD countries real house prices have increased by 32%.

House price indices (2015=100) measure the change over time of all residential properties (flats, detached houses, terraced houses, etc.) purchased by households. It includes both new and existing dwellings when available, independently of their final use and their previous owners. Only market prices are considered and include the price of the land on which residential buildings are located.
2005 data were not available in several countries; when it is the case data for the nearest available year were used: Latvia and Lithuania (2006), Luxembourg (2007), the Czech Republic (2008), Poland (2010) and Hungary (2007). 2019 data were not available in several countries; as such, data for 2018 were used: Chile, Colombia and New Zealand. Real house price data for Costa Rica were not available.

Source: OECD Affordable Housing database


get data données

… and this has pushed up rents, too.



Rent index (2015=100)

Over the period 2005-2020 rents have increase in almost all OECD countries. On average across OECD countries, rents have increased by 35%.

The rental prices come from the OECD Main Economic Indicators database and refer to Consumer Price Indices (CPIs) for Actual rentals for housing (COICOP 04.1). If this indicator is missing for a country, another indicator is chosen. The chosen indicator are usually those corresponding to the CPI aggregate for Housing including Actual rentals for housing (COICOP 04.1), imputed rentals for housing (COICOP 04.2) and Maintenance and repair of the dwelling (COICOP 04.3).

Source: OECD Affordable Housing database


get data données

Low income households are struggling with rising housing costs …



Share of overburdened households, by tenure, in per cent, 2019 or latest year.

In 2019, on average across OECD countries 34% of low income (bottom quintile) households living in a privately rented house, spend more than 40% of their disposable income on housing-related expenses.

Overburden is defined as the share of population in the bottom quintile of the income distribution spending more than 40% of disposible income on mortgage and rent.
In Chile, Mexico, Korea and the United States gross income instead of disposable income is used due to data limitations. No data on mortgage principal repayments are available for Denmark due to data limitations. Results only include categories with enough observations.

Source: OECD Affordable Housing database


get data données

… and often experience precarious housing conditions.



Share of overcrowded dwellings, by income distribution quintile, in per cent, 2019 or latest year.

In 2019, on average across OECD countries, 16% of the households in the bottom quintile (20% poorest households) lived in an overcrowded household.

For Chile, Mexico, Denmark, the Netherlands and the United States no information on subsidised tenants due to data limitations.
Low-income households are households in the bottom quintile of the net income distribution. In Chile, Mexico, Korea and the United States gross income is used due to data limitations. Data for Japan only available on the respondent level due to data limitations, results, therefore, refer to the population, rather than to households. Income quintiles for Canada are based on adjusted after-tax household income.

Source: OECD Affordable Housing database


get data données

Support for vulnerable groups is increasingly focused on housing allowances …



Structural evolution of public spending on housing, OECD-25 average, as % GDP, 2001 to 2018.

On average across OECD countries the increase in housing allowances from 2001 to 2009 has reverted to a decreasing trend, reaching 0.3% of GDP in 2017. Since 2009, direct investment in housing development has been reduced gradually with virtually no additional investment since 2015. The amount of public capital transfers for housing development has stabilised at their lowest level since 2001.

The OECD-25 average is the unweighted average across the 25 OECD countries with capital transfer and gross capital formation data available from 2001. It excludes Australia, Canada, Chile, Iceland, Israel, Japan, Korea, Lithuania, New Zealand, Turkey and the United States.
Direct investment in housing development refers to government gross capital formation in housing development.
Public capital transfers for housing development refers to indirect capital expenditure made through transfers to organisations outside of government.
Housing development includes, among other things, the acquisition of land needed for the construction of dwellings, the construction or purchase and remodelling of dwelling units for the general public or for people with special needs, and grants or loans to support the expansion, improvement or maintenance of the housing stock.
Spending on housing allowances does not include spending on mortgage relief, capital subsidies towards construction and implicit subsidies towards accommodation costs.

Source: OECD Affordable Housing database


get data données

… and the supply of social housing stock has not kept up with demand in most countries.



Social rental dwellings, as a % of total housing stock, in selected years (2010, 2018).

The proportion of social rental dwellings in the total housing stock has barely increased since 2010 in most countries and is very heterogeneous across OECD countries. It represents close to 38% of the dwelling stock in the Netherlands but less than 1% in Lithuania.

For New Zealand, data refer to the number of social housing places (public housing) that are funded through central government, and do not include social housing provided by local authorities.
For the United States, the social housing stock includes public housing, subsidised units developed through specific programmes targeting the elderly and disabled people, as well as income-restricted units created through the Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) programme; the number of public housing units as well as dwellings financed through the LIHTC programme have been adjusted to avoid double-counting, following OECD correspondence with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.
For Canada, data exclude units managed by the Société d’habitation du Québec (SHQ) for the Province of Quebec.
Turkish data only includes social housing produced between 2002-2020 by the Housing Development Administration (TOKİ) and exclude those provided by local governments.
For Spain, the figures may also contain other types of reduced rent housing, e.g. employer-provided dwellings.

Source: OECD (2020): “Social housing: A key part of past and future housing policy”, Employment, Labour and Social Affairs Policy Briefs, OECD, Paris.


get data données

Le logement est le plus gros poste de dépenses des ménages…



Dépenses des ménages par poste de consommation, par tranche de revenus, moyenne de l’OCDE, 2016 ou dernière année connue

Les dépenses de logement représentent en moyenne 37 % des dépenses de consommation des ménages à bas revenus, contre 31 % pour les ménages aux revenus intermédiaires et 25 % pour les ménages aux revenus élevés. Quelle que soit la tranche de revenus considérée, le logement est le premier poste de dépenses des ménages, même si sa part dans le budget diminue à mesure que les revenus augmentent.

« Inférieur » correspond au quintile inférieur des revenus (soit les 20 % de ménages les plus pauvres) ; « Supérieur » correspond au quintile supérieur des revenus (soit les 20 % de ménages les plus riches).

Source: OECD Affordable Housing database


get data données

… et il pèse de plus en plus lourdement sur leur budget depuis plusieurs années.



Variation, en points de pourcentage, de la part des postes de dépenses dans le budget des ménages, toutes catégories de revenus confondues

Compte tenu de la hausse des prix des logements constatée depuis 2005 dans la plupart des pays, le logement est non seulement le plus gros poste de dépenses des ménages en moyenne, mais aussi celui qui augmente le plus rapidement. Entre 2005 et 2015, les dépenses de logement ont augmenté de 5 points de pourcentage en moyenne dans 20 pays de l’OCDE.

La moyenne OCDE-20 non pondérée porte sur l’Allemagne, l’Autriche, la Belgique, l’Espagne, la Finlande, la Grèce, la Hongrie, l’Irlande, la Lettonie, la Lituanie, le Luxembourg, la Norvège, les Pays-Bas, la Pologne, le Portugal, la République slovaque, la République tchèque, la Slovénie, la Suède et la Turquie.

La moyenne OCDE-10 non pondérée porte sur l’Allemagne, l’Autriche, la Belgique, la Finlande, la Grèce, l’Irlande, le Luxembourg, les Pays-Bas, le Portugal et la Suède.

Source: OECD Affordable Housing database


get data données

Les prix des logements ont fortement augmenté au cours des 15 dernières années…



Indice des prix réels des logements (2015=100)

Entre 2005 et 2019, les prix réels des logements ont augmenté dans la quasi-totalité des pays de l’OCDE. En moyenne dans les pays de l’OCDE, les prix réels des logements ont augmenté de 32 %.

Les indices des prix des logements (2015=100) mesurent la variation dans le temps des prix de l’ensemble des biens immobiliers d’habitation (appartements, maisons individuelles, maisons mitoyennes, etc.) acquis par les ménages. Ils recouvrent à la fois les logements neufs et anciens, le cas échéant, indépendamment de leur utilisation finale et de leurs précédents propriétaires. Seuls les prix de marché sont pris en considération et ils incluent le prix du terrain sur lequel sont situés les biens immobiliers d’habitation.
Faute de données disponibles pour 2005 dans plusieurs pays, on a utilisé les données relatives à la dernière année disponible : 2006 pour la Lettonie et la Lituanie, 2007 pour la Hongrie et le Luxembourg, 2008 pour la République tchèque et 2010 pour la Pologne. Faute de données disponibles pour 2019 dans plusieurs pays, on a utilisé les données de 2018 pour le Chili, la Colombie et la Nouvelle-Zélande. Aucune donnée n’était disponible sur les prix réels des logements au Costa Rica.

Source: OECD Affordable Housing database


get data données

… ce qui a provoqué une hausse des loyers.



Indice des loyers (2015=100)

Entre 2005 et 2020, les loyers ont augmenté dans la quasi-totalité des pays de l’OCDE. En moyenne dans les pays de l’OCDE, les loyers se sont renchéris de 35 %.

Les loyers sont extraits de la base de données de l’OCDE sur les principaux indicateurs économiques et font référence aux indices des prix à la consommation (IPC) concernant les loyers effectifs des logements (COICOP 04.1). Si cet indicateur n’est pas disponible pour un pays, on en utilise un autre. L’indicateur retenu est généralement celui qui correspond à l’IPC global pour le logement, qui englobe les loyers effectifs des logements (COICOP 04.1), les loyers imputés des logements (COICOP 04.2) et les charges d’entretien et de réparation des logements (COICOP 04.3).

Source: OECD Affordable Housing database


get data données

Les ménages modestes sont durement touchés par la hausse du coût du logement…



Pourcentage de ménages dans l’incapacité de faire face au coût du logement, par statut d’occupation, 2019 ou dernière année connue.

En moyenne dans les pays de l’OCDE en 2019, 17 % de la population du dernier quintile de la distribution des revenus vivant dans un logement locatif du marché privé consacrait plus de 40 % de son revenu disponible aux dépenses de logement.

La charge excessive du coût du logement concerne la proportion de la population du dernier quintile de la distribution des revenus qui consacre plus de 40 % de son revenu disponible au remboursement d’un emprunt hypothécaire ou au paiement d’un loyer.
Au Chili, au Mexique, en Corée et aux États-Unis, on utilise le revenu brut plutôt que le revenu disponible, en raison des contraintes de disponibilité de données. En raison des contraintes de disponibilité de données, aucune donnée n’est disponible sur le remboursement du principal des prêts hypothécaires pour le Danemark. Ne sont présentés que les catégorie avec suffisamment d’observations.

Source: OECD Affordable Housing database


get data données

… ce qui débouche souvent sur des conditions de logement précaires.



Pourcentage de ménages vivant dans des logements surpeuplés, par quintile de la distribution des revenus, 2019 ou dernière année connue.

En moyenne dans les pays de l’OCDE en 2019, 16 % des ménages situés dans le quintile inférieur des revenus (soit les 20 % les plus pauvres) vivaient dans un logement surpeuplé.

En raison des contraintes de disponibilité de données, aucune information n’est disponible sur les locataires de logements subventionnés pour le Chili, le Mexique, le Danemark, les Pays-Bas et les États-Unis.
Les ménages modestes sont ceux qui se situent dans le quintile inférieur de la distribution des revenus nets. Au Chili, au Mexique, en Corée et aux États-Unis, on utilise le revenu brut en raison des contraintes de disponibilité de données. En raison des contraintes de disponibilité de données, les données du Japon sont des données issues d’enquêtes. Les résultats se rapportent donc à la population et non aux ménages. Les quintiles de revenu pour le Canada reposent sur le revenu ajusté des ménages après impôts.

Source: OECD Affordable Housing database


get data données

L’aide budgétaire ciblée sur les groupes vulnérables se concentre de plus en plus sur les allocations de logement…



Évolution structurelle des dépenses publiques consacrées au logement, moyenne OCDE-25, en % du PIB, 2001 à 2018.

En moyenne dans les pays de l’OCDE, l’augmentation des allocations de logement constatée entre 2001 et 2009 s’est inversée, et ces dernières représentent 0.3 % du PIB depuis 2018. Depuis 2009, l’investissement direct dans la construction de logements diminue progressivement, et depuis 2015, quasiment aucun investissement supplémentaire n’a été enregistré. Le montant des transferts en capital des administrations publiques aux fins de la construction de logements s’est stabilisé à son plus bas niveau depuis 2001.

La moyenne de l’OCDE-25 est la moyenne non pondérée de 25 pays de l’OCDE pour lesquels on dispose de données relatives aux transferts en capital et à la formation brute de capital depuis 2001. Elle ne prend pas en compte les pays suivants : Australie, Canada, Chili, Corée, États-Unis, Islande, Israël, Japon, Lituanie, Nouvelle-Zélande et Turquie.
L’investissement direct dans la construction de logements se rapporte à la formation brute de capital des administrations publiques aux fins de la construction de logements.
Les transferts en capital des administrations publiques aux fins de la construction de logements se rapportent aux dépenses d’investissement indirectes effectuées par le biais de transferts à des organismes extérieurs à l’administration publique.
La construction de logements couvre, entre autres, l’acquisition des terrains nécessaires à leur construction, la construction ou l’achat et la rénovation d’habitations destinées à la population en général ou à des personnes ayant des besoins particuliers, et les subventions ou prêts à l’appui de l’expansion, de l’amélioration ou de l’entretien du parc de logements.
Les dépenses au titre des allocations de logement ne comprennent pas les dépenses au titre des allègements hypothécaires, les subventions aux investissements dans la construction et les subventions implicites aux frais de logement.

Source: OECD Affordable Housing database


get data données

… alors que l’offre de logements sociaux a augmenté moins rapidement que la demande dans la plupart des pays



Logements locatifs sociaux, en % du parc de logements total, en 2010 et 2018.

La proportion de logements locatifs sociaux dans le parc de logements total n’a quasiment pas augmenté depuis 2010 dans la plupart des pays, et elle est très variable d’un pays de l’OCDE à l’autre. Ainsi, les logements locatifs sociaux représentent près de 38 % du parc de logements aux Pays-Bas, contre moins de 1 % en Lituanie.

Pour la Nouvelle-Zélande, les données portent sur le nombre de logements sociaux financés par l’administration centrale, et n’englobent pas les logements sociaux fournis par les autorités locales.
Pour les États-Unis, le parc de logements sociaux comprend le logement social, les logements subventionnés construits dans le cadre de programmes ciblant spécifiquement les personnes âgées et les personnes handicapées, ainsi que les logements réservés à certaines catégories de revenus au titre du programme Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) ; le nombre de logements sociaux et de logements financés par le biais du programme LIHTC a été ajusté pour éviter une double comptabilisation conformément aux échanges entre l’OCDE et le ministère américain du Logement et de l’Urbanisme.
Pour le Canada, les données ne tiennent pas compte des logements gérés par la Société d’habitation du Québec (SHQ) pour la Province de Québec.
Les données de la Turquie ne tiennent compte que des logements sociaux produits entre 2002 et 2020 par l’organisme TOKI en charge de la construction de logements et excluent ceux qui sont fournis par les autorités locales.
Pour l’Espagne, les chiffres peuvent aussi se rapporter à d’autres types de logements à loyers réduits, comme les logements fournis par les employeurs.
Pour la Colombie, les données ne portent que sur les logements locatifs sociaux produits depuis 2019 dans le cadre du programme Semillero de propietarios.

Source: OCDE (2020) : “Social housing: A key part of past and future housing policy”, Employment, Labour and Social Affairs Policy Briefs, OCDE, Paris.


get data données

👉   Read full chapter on Promoting Affordability in the OECD Housing Synthesis Report

👉   Lire le chapitre complet sur le thème Favoriser l’accessibilité financière dans le rapport de synthèse de l’OCDE sur le logement

Housing outcomes and policies vary considerably across countries. Visualise these differences by selecting a country in the dropdown menu below or hovering over the variables in each indicator. For more details about these indicators, please see the Definitions section below.

Les résultats et l’action publique en matière de logement sont très variables selon les pays. Pour visualiser ces différences, sélectionnez un pays dans la liste ou placez le pointeur au-dessus des variables dans le graphique. Pour plus de détails sur les variables, veuillez vous reporter à la partie intitulée Définitions.