Efficiency

Boosting housing market efficiencyRenforcer l’efficience du marché du logement

The efficiency of housing markets reflects the capacity of the housing sector to supply an adequate quantity and quality of dwellings. Institutional characteristics, local constraints, population dynamics and economic performance are the main drivers of the difference in price dynamics observed across OECD countries and regions.

This section provides an overview of the main outcomes related to housing efficiency and displays country-specific performances across relevant indicators.

L’efficience du secteur du logement correspond à sa capacité de fournir des biens immobiliers d’habitation en quantité suffisante et d’une qualité adéquate. Les caractéristiques institutionnelles, les contraintes locales, la dynamique de la population et les résultats économiques sont les principaux déterminants des différences de dynamique des prix observées entre les pays et les régions de l’OCDE.

Cette partie offre une vue d’ensemble des principales conclusions des travaux relatifs à l’efficience du secteur du logement et montre les résultats obtenus par chaque pays à l’aune d’indicateurs chiffrés.



Key housing data

Données clés sur le logement

House prices have increased faster than income in most countries…



Evolution of house price to income ratio, 2000-2017.

From 2000 to 2017, house prices have increased more quickly than income in most OECD countries, suggesting that supply of new dwelling has not kept up with increasing demand.

Average price of a 100m2 dwelling expressed in years of average household disposable income. For Australia, Canada, Korea and New Zealand the number corresponds to 2016 instead of 2017. The choice of fixed-size (100m2) dwelling is made to ease cross-country comparisons.

Source: Bricongne, Turrini and Pontuch (2019), “Assessing House Prices: Insights from ‘Houselev’, a Dataset of Price Level Estimates”.’


get data données

… as housing supply has not kept pace with demand.



Growth of dwelling stock vs. growth of real disposable income.

Housing supply, measured by the number of dwellings, has expanded much more slowly than household disposable income in many countries. Real house prices have tended to increase more in countries where supply has not kept up with income growth (below the 45° line) by comparison with countries where supply has expanded faster than income (above the 45° line).

Source: “OECD Economic Outlook database, Cavalleri, Cournède and Ziemann (2019), “Housing markets and macroeconomic risks”, and OECD calculations."


get data données

House prices evolve very differently within countries…



Regional house price index, 2019 (2005=100).

House price developments differ across cities and regions of the same country, reflecting differences in local demand but also natural and regulatory constraints to residential construction.

House Price Indices (HPIs), are index numbers measuring the rate at which the prices of residential properties (flats, detached houses, terraced houses, etc.) purchased by households are changing over time. Both new and existing dwellings are covered, if available, independently of their final use and their previous owners. Only market prices are considered. They include the price of the land on which residential buildings are located.

Source: “OECD Regional House Price Database.


get data données

… partly because of differences in housing supply responsivenesses.



Metropolitan housing supply elasticities.

The figure provides estimates of the local supply elasticities and shows the intra-country heterogeneity of supply responsiveness to shifts in housing prices.

Housing supply elasticities measure how much construction reacts to changes in house prices. High elasticities reflect the ability of housing markets to absorb demand and limit a passthrough of demand pressures to house prices.

Source: “Bétin and Ziemann (2019), “How responsive are housing markets in the OECD? Regional level estimates”."


get data données

Several housing-related policies affect both housing supply and demand.



Selected housing policy indicators.

Demand and supply of housing are affected by policy decisions and institutional characteristics of housing markets. This figure presents an example of three important housing related policies.
The governance indicator assesses the organisation of land-use decision-making processes across different levels of government. Higher values of the indicator reflect more overlap and/or more decentralisation.

The rent control index reflects several dimensions restricting the landlord’s ability to set and increase rents. The indicator summarises the extent of restrictions on setting the rent level initially, updating it and passing costs (such as renovation expenses) on to tenants. The indicator corresponds to the legislation applicable in a country; sub-national entities may apply more restrictive regimes, implying a degree of within-country heterogeneity.

METR stands for ‘marginal effective tax rate’ for owner-occupied, debt-financed housing investments. Negative effective tax rates reflect generous tax relief, notably mortgage interest deductibility that foster the demand for mortgage loans.

Source: “Updated from Cournède, B., V. Ziemann and F. De Pace (2020), The Future of Housing: Policy Scenarios, OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 1624, OECD Publishing, Paris”


get data données

Demand for housing will continue to exert upward pressure on house prices…



Projected developments of housing demand drivers (in percentage point).

The figure depicts projections of three fundamental housing demand drivers over a fifty year horizon. For instance Australia, Luxembourg and Sweden appear as the three countries with the most dynamic population growth over the projection horizon. Similarily the largest real disposable per capita income increase is projected for Latvia, Estonia and Ireland.
While such projections are highly uncertain they provide a benchmark to assess which countries will face particular housing demand pressures that could lead to an increase in future house prices.


For more information about the OECD’s long-term projections see Guillemette, Y., A. De Mauro and D. Turner (2018), “Saving, Investment, Capital Stock and Current Account Projections in Long-Term Scenarios”, OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 1461, OECD Publishing, Paris, https://dx.doi.org/10.1787/aa519fc9-en.

Source: “Cournède, B., V. Ziemann and F. De Pace (2020), The Future of Housing: Policy Scenarios, OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 1624, OECD Publishing, Paris”


get data données

… without accompanying supply responses, house prices will increase in most countries in the decades ahead.



Projected percentage point changes between 2020 and 2050 under unchanged policies.

The figure depicts the predicted changes in the housing stock, real house prices as well as house-price-to-income ratios between 2020 and 2050 if current policies were to remain unchanged.
For instance, keeping current policies over the prediction horizon, price-to-income ratios are projected to increase substantially in Luxembourg and Sweden and, to a lesser extent, in Australia, New Zealand, Ireland, Denmark, Norway, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom

Source: “Cournède, B., V. Ziemann and F. De Pace (2020), The Future of Housing: Policy Scenarios, OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 1624, OECD Publishing, Paris”


get data données

Housing policy reforms could help to curb house price increases …



Simulated impact of reform scenarios on price-to-income ratios by 2050.

The figure depicts the predicted effect of three housing market reforms. For instance, reducing the overlapping of land use decisions among different government levels (streamline land use policy) offers potential to improve affordability (lower price to income ratio) by ensuring responsive and efficient land-use regulations.

Similarily, removing mortgage interest rate relief contributes to improvements in the affordability of housing (lower price to income). For instance, larger impacts of mortgage interest relief reforms could be felt in the Netherlands and Sweden


No bar signifies the absence of mortgage interest relief and, in the case of the rent control and land-use scenarios, that the country does not implement a reform as it was already less or as restrictive as the benchmark country.

Source: “Cournède, B., V. Ziemann and F. De Pace (2020), The Future of Housing: Policy Scenarios, OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 1624, OECD Publishing, Paris”


get data données

… and offset additional cost pressures from the necessary energy efficiency improvement of buildings.



Necessary energy upgrading of buildings will weight on affordability.

Tightening building standards and accelerating renovation are projected to affect housing market dynamics. The figure illustrates the simulated impact of the higher construction cost and renovation rate implied by tightening buiding standards and accelerating renovation policies. The results suggest that such reforms reduce affordability. The additional number of years of disposable income varies between 0.2 years in Poland or Latvia and more than 1.5 years in Sweden, Australia or New Zealand. Cross-country heterogeneity is driven by the initial level of the renovation rate and the housing supply elasticities.

Changes with respect to the baseline are shown (percentage points for dwelling stocks and residential investment; the number of years of disposable income to purchase a 100m2 dwelling for the price-to-rent ratio).
Environmental regulation to move towards carbon neutrality assumes an immediate increase of 10% in construction costs as well as a gradual increase in the heavy renovation rate of one percentage point from the baseline heavy renovation rate (varies by country) until 2035. After 2035, the heavy renovation rate declines uniformly towards 1% per year by 2050.

Source: “Cournède, B., V. Ziemann and F. De Pace (2020), The Future of Housing: Policy Scenarios, OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 1624, OECD Publishing, Paris”


get data données

Les prix des logements ont augmenté plus vite que les revenus dans la plupart des pays …



Évolution du ratio prix des logements/revenu, 2000-2017.

Entre 2000 et 2017, les prix de l’immobilier d’habitation ont augmenté plus vite que les revenus dans la plupart des pays de l’OCDE, ce qui laisse à penser que l’offre de logements neufs a progressé moins rapidement que la demande.

Prix moyen d’un logement de 100 m2 exprimé en années de revenu disponible moyen des ménages. Pour l’Australie, le Canada, la Corée et la Nouvelle-Zélande, les données se rapportent à 2016 et non à 2017. Le choix d’une superficie de logement fixe (100 m2) vise à faciliter les comparaisons internationales.

Source: Bricongne, Turrini et Pontuch (2019), « Assessing House Prices: Insights from ‘Houselev’, a Dataset of Price Level Estimates ».’


get data données

… l’offre de biens immobiliers d’habitation ayant augmenté moins rapidement que la demande



Croissance du parc de logements et du revenu disponible réel.

L’offre de logements, mesurée par leur nombre, a augmenté nettement plus lentement que le revenu disponible des ménages dans de nombreux pays. Les prix réels de l’immobilier d’habitation ont eu tendance à augmenter plus vite dans les pays où la croissance de l’offre a été plus lente que celle des revenus (points situés en dessous de la bissectrice) que dans les pays où la progression de l’offre a, au contraire, été plus rapide que celle des revenus (points situés au-dessus de la bissectrice).

Source: “Base de données des Perspectives économiques de l’OCDE, Cavalleri, Cournède et Ziemann (2019), « Housing markets and macroeconomic risks », et calculs de l’OCDE.”


get data données

Les prix des logements évoluent de manière très contrastée à l’intérieur de chaque pays …



Indices régionaux des prix des logements, 2019 (2005=100).

L’évolution des prix des logements est contrastée entre les villes et les régions d’un même pays, ce qui tient aux différences de demande locale, mais aussi aux contraintes naturelles et réglementaires qui s’exercent sur la construction résidentielle.

Les indices des prix des logements (IPL) mesurent le rythme auquel les prix des biens immobiliers d’habitation (appartements, maisons individuelles, maisons mitoyennes, etc.) acquis par les ménages varient dans le temps. Ils recouvrent à la fois les logements neufs et anciens, le cas échéant, indépendamment de leur utilisation finale et de leurs précédents propriétaires. Seuls les prix de marché sont pris en considération, et ils incluent le prix du terrain sur lequel se trouvent les biens immobiliers d’habitation.

Source: “Base de données de l’OCDE sur les prix régionaux des logements.


get data données

… pour partie en raison des différences de réactivité de l’offre de logements.



Élasticité des prix des logements au niveau métropolitain

Ce graphique présente des estimations de l’élasticité locale de l’offre et montre l’hétérogénéité intranationale de la réactivité de l’offre aux variations des prix des logements.

L’élasticité de l’offre de logements indique dans quelle mesure la construction réagit aux variations des prix de l’immobilier d’habitation. Une élasticité élevée indique que le marché du logement est en mesure d’absorber la demande et de limiter la répercussion sur les prix de l’immobilier d’habitation des tensions exercées par la demande.

Source: “Bétin et Ziemann (2019), « How responsive are housing markets in the OECD? Regional level estimates ».”


get data données

Plusieurs politiques liées au logement influent à la fois sur l’offre et sur la demande de biens immobiliers d’habitation.



Sélection d’indicateurs de la politique du logement.

La demande et l’offre de logements sont affectées par les décisions des pouvoirs publics et les caractéristiques institutionnelles des marchés de l’immobilier d’habitation. Ce graphique illustre l’importance de trois politiques liées au logement.
L’indicateur de gouvernance porte sur l’organisation des processus de prise de décisions concernant l’occupation des sols entre les différents niveaux d’administration. Sa valeur est d’autant plus élevée que les chevauchements de compétences et/ou leur décentralisation sont importants.

L’indice d’encadrement des loyers recouvre plusieurs dimensions limitant la capacité des propriétaires de fixer et d’augmenter les loyers. Il mesure de manière synthétique l’ampleur des restrictions qui s’appliquent à la fixation du niveau initial des loyers, à leur révision et à la répercussion de certains coûts (comme les frais de rénovation) sur les locataires. Cet indicateur correspond à la législation applicable dans le pays ; les entités infranationales peuvent appliquer des régimes plus restrictifs, d’où une certaine hétérogénéité intranationale.

Le TMIE est le taux marginal d’imposition effectif des logements occupés par leur propriétaire, dont l’acquisition a été financée par emprunt. Un taux d’imposition effectif négatif s’explique par des allégements d’impôt généreux, notamment par une déductibilité fiscale des intérêts d’emprunt hypothécaire qui stimule la demande de prêts hypothécaires.

Source: “Mise à jour de Cournède, B., V. Ziemann et F. De Pace (2020), « The Future of Housing: Policy Scenarios », Documents de travail du Département des affaires économiques de l’OCDE, n° 1624, Éditions OCDE, Paris


get data données

La demande de logements continuera de tirer leurs prix vers le haut …



Évolution projetée des déterminants de la demande de logements (en points de pourcentage).

Ce graphique présente les projections d’évolution de trois déterminants fondamentaux de la demande de logements à un horizon de cinquante ans. Ainsi, il apparaît que l’Australie, le Luxembourg et la Suède sont les trois pays où la croissance démographique devrait être la plus dynamique au cours de la période considérée. De même, c’est en Lettonie, en Estonie et en Irlande que l’augmentation du revenu disponible réel par habitant devrait être la plus forte.
Ces projections sont naturellement entourées d’une grande incertitude, mais elles constituent une base d’évaluation pour identifier les pays qui seront confrontés à des pressions de la demande de logements particulièrement fortes, susceptibles d’entraîner une hausse des prix de l’immobilier d’habitation dans l’avenir.


Pour en savoir plus sur les projections à long terme de l’OCDE, voir Guillemette, Y., A. De Mauro et D. Turner (2018), « Saving, Investment, Capital Stock and Current Account Projections in Long-Term Scenarios », Documents de travail du Département des affaires économiques de l’OCDE, n° 1461, Éditions OCDE, Paris, https://dx.doi.org/10.1787/aa519fc9-en.

Source: “Cournède, B., V. Ziemann et F. De Pace (2020), « The Future of Housing: Policy Scenarios », Documents de travail du Département des affaires économiques de l’OCDE, n° 1624, Éditions OCDE, Paris”


get data données

… et en l’absence de réaction concomitante de l’offre, les prix des logements vont augmenter dans la plupart des pays au cours des prochaines décennies.



Variation projetée en points de pourcentage entre 2020 et 2050 à politiques inchangées.

Ce graphique présente les variations projetées du parc de logement, des prix réels des logements et du ratio prix des logements/revenu entre 2020 et 2050, à politiques inchangées.
Ainsi, dans l’hypothèse de politiques inchangées au cours de la période considérée, le ratio prix des logements/revenu devrait augmenter sensiblement au Luxembourg et en Suède et, dans une moindre mesure, en Australie, en Nouvelle-Zélande, en Irlande, au Danemark, en Norvège, aux Pays-Bas et au Royaume Uni.

Source: “Cournède, B., V. Ziemann et F. De Pace (2020), « The Future of Housing: Policy Scenarios », Documents de travail du Département des affaires économiques de l’OCDE, n° 1624, Éditions OCDE, Paris”


get data données

Des réformes de la politique du logement pourraient contribuer à limiter la hausse des prix de l’immobilier d’habitation …



Effet simulé de différents scénarios de réforme sur le ratio prix des logements/revenu d’ici à 2050.

Ce graphique illustre l’effet simulé de trois réformes du marché du logement. Ainsi, une réduction des chevauchements entre les différents niveaux d’administration en matière de prise de décisions concernant l’occupation des sols (rationalisation de la politique d’occupation des sols) pourrait permettre d’améliorer l’accessibilité financière du logement (réduction du ratio prix des logements/revenu), en garantissant l’adaptabilité et l’efficience de la réglementation de l’occupation des sols.

De même, la suppression de la déductibilité fiscale des intérêts d’emprunt hypothécaire contribue à améliorer l’accessibilité financière du logement (diminution du ratio prix des logements/revenu). Ainsi, c’est au Pays-Bas et en Suède qu’une réforme de la déduction fiscale au titre des intérêts d’emprunt hypothécaire pourrait avoir les effets les plus importants.


Une absence de barre indique qu’il n’existe pas de déduction fiscale au titre des intérêts d’emprunt hypothécaire dans le pays considéré et, dans le cas des scénarios relatifs à l’encadrement des loyers et à l’occupation des sols, que le pays ne met pas en œuvre de réforme, car sa réglementation était déjà moins ou aussi restrictive que celle du pays de référence.

Source: “Cournède, B., V. Ziemann et F. De Pace (2020), « The Future of Housing: Policy Scenarios », Documents de travail du Département des affaires économiques de l’OCDE, n° 1624, Éditions OCDE, Paris”


get data données

… et compenser les tensions supplémentaires sur les coûts résultant de l’amélioration nécessaire de l’efficacité énergétique des bâtiments.



La nécessaire rénovation énergétique des bâtiments pèsera sur l’accessibilité financière du logement.

Un durcissement des normes de construction et une accélération de la rénovation des bâtiments devrait influer sur la dynamique du marché du logement. Ce graphique illustre l’effet simulé de l’augmentation des coûts de construction et du taux de rénovation correspondant à un durcissement des normes de construction et à une accélération des mesures de rénovation. Les résultats obtenus laissent à penser que, sur la base des hypothèses retenues dans le modèle, l’accessibilité financière du logement tend à se dégrader. Le nombre d’années supplémentaires de revenu disponible varie de 0.2 an en Pologne ou en Lettonie à plus de 1.5 an en Suède, en Australie ou en Nouvelle-Zélande. L’hétérogénéité observée entre pays est déterminée par le niveau initial du taux de rénovation et par l’élasticité de l’offre de logements.

Le graphique présente les variations de chaque indicateur par rapport à son niveau de référence (en points de pourcentage pour le parc de logements et l’investissement résidentiel ; en nombre d’années de revenu disponible nécessaire pour acquérir un logement de 100 m2 pour le ratio prix des logements/loyer).
L’adoption de règles environnementales permettant de progresser vers la neutralité carbone est simulée sous la forme d’une hausse immédiate de 10 % des coûts de construction, ainsi que d’une augmentation progressive du taux de rénovation lourde de 1 point de pourcentage par rapport à son niveau de référence (qui varie selon les pays) jusqu’en 2035. Après 2035, le taux de rénovation lourde diminue uniformément pour s’établir à 1 % par an en 2050.

Source: “Cournède, B., V. Ziemann et F. De Pace (2020), « The Future of Housing: Policy Scenarios », Documents de travail du Département des affaires économiques de l’OCDE , n° 1624, Éditions OCDE, Paris”


get data données

👉   Read full chapter on Boosting Efficiency in the OECD Housing Synthesis Report

👉   Lire le chapitre complet sur le thème Renforcer l’efficience du marché du logement dans le rapport de synthèse de l’OCDE sur le logement


Housing outcomes and policies vary considerably across countries. Visualise these differences by selecting a country in the dropdown menu below or hovering over the variables in each indicator. For more details about these indicators, please see the Definitions section below.

Les résultats et l’action publique en matière de logement sont très variables selon les pays. Pour visualiser ces différences, sélectionnez un pays dans la liste ou placez le pointeur au-dessus des variables dans le graphique. Pour plus de détails sur les variables, veuillez vous reporter aux Définitions.